Mongabay WildTech 10th July 2015 / Laurel Neme When border agents seize two tons of smuggled ivory, how do they tell where it’s from? When meat on sale in Southeast Asia is suspected to be from a tiger, how can the police prove it? And when blood in a hunter’s truck is thought to come from a poached…

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First posted on 2015-05-01   Fantastic article by Michele Berger, Science Editor for Weather.com that explores the field of wildlife forensics. For complete article with photos, please see: http://stories.weather.com/animalforensics. In it, you’ll meet many of the folks that have appeared in my articles, podcast and books. Bravo to Ms. Berger for a great and comprehensive article!  …

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Kenya Wildlife Service forensics lab is a step closer to opening. Much is promised but challenges remain. Article in Kenya’s The Star reviews progress. See: http://allafrica.com/stories/201410131052.html   13 October 2014 Kenya: KWS Plans Sh100 Million DNA Lab to Catch Poachers By Gilbert Koech CONVICTION rates for crimes arising from handling of wildlife trophies will soon rise…

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On September 19, 2014, the Today show aired a segment on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s National Wildlife Forensics Lab. The segment is called Fowl play? Scientists investigate wildlife crime in secret Oregon lab. It takes you inside the high-tech crime lab where investigators use forensics to solve cases — in which the victims are…

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  Bucking the worldwide trend, Nepal continues its successful fight against poaching.   Laurel Neme for National Geographic Published March 12, 2014 On World Wildlife Day, March 3, Nepal celebrated 365 days with zero poaching. No rhinos, tigers, or elephants were killed. It’s the second year of such success in Nepal. In 2011 the country also had…

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 Posted by Laurel Neme in A Voice for Elephants on May 23, 2013     Hong Kong Customs seized 113 ivory tusks in a cargo shipment at Hong Kong International Airport on April 30 this year. Officers detected the ivory when they X-rayed a consignment labeled “spare parts” being shipped from Burundi, Africa to Singapore via Hong Kong. DNA analysis…

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  Carbofuran was developed in the 1960s to replace more persistent pesticides such as DDT. Since then it has repeatedly been implicated in the mass mortality of nontarget wildlife, especially avian species. Conservationists worldwide have sought to regulate or ban the use of carbofuran for decades. However, this controversial product remains registered for use in…

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  When the 2009 National Academy of Sciences report, Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward, criticized the scientific reliability of certain forensic techniques, such as fingerprint analysis, that is commonly used to fight human crime, wildlife forensic scientists feared the findings might also undercut their testimony in courts of law. In response,…

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